We Come: A creative expression of Binghampton United Methodist Church, An original poem by Kory N. T

Sometimes broken, sometimes weary But we come Binghampton United Methodist Church Sharing the value of the human experience We come We come bringing our gifts with prayers we lift Our hearts to one another Laying aside our titles, moving beyond our age, gender, race, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic status, We come. We are brothers and sisters in Christ Striving together to do God’s will We come Breaking through the darkness Acknowledging the light that’s deep within each of us Binghampton United Methodist Church We come With hearts full of love, forgiveness, reconciliation, and healing We come and we gather at the table For a love feast that binds us Together as

A Most Difficult Concept for Christians - Leading to the joys and fruits of authentic, relational mi

One of my favorite resources for Communities of Shalom is the book titled Building a People of Power by Robert Linthicum. Within the book, Linthicum gives a great introduction to a key concept that churches need to apply if they are serious about working for the common good of their community and seeking the shalom of the neighborhood where they worship. This concept is often referred to as the Iron Rule: Never do for others what they can do for Members and neighbors from Trinity UMC themselves. Or put another way, the people who are best able to deal with a problem are the people most affected by the problem. Linthicum writes, “I have discovered in more than 50 years of ministry that th

Servant Leadership: Living, Loving, and Learning in Community - Making a difference through radical

Not too long ago, I had the privilege of sitting down and talking with Floridia Jackson, a Memphis native who has most recently become the Director of the Memphis School of Servant Leadership. Floridia has been active with this school for several years. She started off with The School while in seminary. At the time, she was seeking a group of people that were “like-working” in that they shared in a common mission to make a difference in the world through radical love and inclusion, and work against oppression and other injustices. She was encouraged to move forward in this mission in the classes that she took on “the call” and “racism to reconciliation” at Memphis School of Servant Leadershi

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Center for Transforming Communities, Inc.

The Commons on Merton

258 N. Merton St.

Memphis, TN 38112

 

 

901-324-3005

 

© 2017 by Center for Transforming Communities, Inc. 

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